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Electric Fan on Australian E models
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Share your modifications both the ones that worked and ones not worth doing.

TOPIC: Electric Fan on Australian E models

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 7 years, 2 months ago #2925

  • zone5
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I think it's a worthwhile mod Clarky, I'm watching with interest.

I have a Vapour speedo fitted, and have the amber temp indication set to 95 deg C, and the red at 105 deg C (you can make it what you want). If I've been running hard then slow down, particularly for a hill climb (but it doesn't have to be) I do sometimes see the red light.

I don't like it, and I suppose you just didn't know when it only had the stock setup. Having said that, have not had any boiling issues, recently flushed and correct coolant/water mix in place.

Based on the temps you found for the other models I may change those values, save the red/amber warnings for when it's more critical, obviously the system is more pressurised than I thought.

chrs
In some societies, what I do would be considered normal...

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 7 years, 2 months ago #2927

  • Clarky
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Thanks Zone5 - interesting to hear your data.

Waiting on parts to be delivered now - temp gauge from ebay and the thermo switch from the UK - been dispatched now apparantly.

Hurry up and wait I suppose..
2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 7 years, 2 months ago #2929

  • DRZ_Dave
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Pics attached
Attachments:

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 7 years, 2 months ago #2930

  • Clarky
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Thanks for sharing them.
2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 7 years, 2 months ago #2958

  • Clarky
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OK, my TTO temperature gauge turned up today from eBay (see pic)

Very neat and very small - it screws straight into the bleed screw in the top of the LH radiator - this is where the water from the engine enters the radiator, so should be at it's hottest.

I thought I'd run a test with it idling from cold outside, purely to see how quickly it builds heat. This was a static test with no airflow through the radiator.

The outside air temp was 16°

Here are the results

0 min = 16°
1 min = 25°
2 min = 38°
3 min = 49°
5 min = 64°
10 min = 92°
12 min = 106°
13 min = 112° Turned off engine

10 min after shutdown = 86°


So, it appears they build heat quite quickly, which would lead me to believe that they would also cool quickly with some airflow. 10 mins after shutdown, and the temp has only dropped to 86°, however no water is circulating to aid cooling (obviously) with the engine off.

I'll try and get some data whilst riding at the weekend, and when I have the fan fitted, I can measure how much heat it is able to bleed off.

All for now

Clarky.
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2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 7 years, 2 months ago #2978

  • Clarky
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Have just run a test with the fan installed to see how much heat it is able to remove from the cooling system when switched on.

I wired it in temporarily from a seperate power supply, let the bike reach a hot temp according to the TTO gauge, then manually switched it on to see how much it could reduce the cooling system temp by, and how long it takes.

Outside air temp was 17°

Fan was switched on when water temp hit 102°

The reaction was almost immediate - water temp was dropping within seconds, after 1 min, temp had dropped to 94° and after 2 mins it was 88°. It eventually dropped it to 82° after about 5 mins - that's a reduction of 20° which I think is fairly impressive.

I have attached a link to a YouTube vid showing the temp gauge, and how quickly it reduces in temp when the fan is switched on - it is a bit long and not particulary interesting, but does demonstrate the effectiveness of this fan. You can see/hear the fan working at the end of the vid at about the 6:25 mark



I have also attached a couple of pics showing the fan temporarily in place with the side panel/fairing installed I have not yet painted the mounting bracket.

I have not yet recorded any temps while riding, but will do so soon. This should give me an idea of what temp to set the on/off parameters of the thermo switch, when it arrives.

Hope some find this useful

Clarky
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2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 7 years, 2 months ago #2981

  • wayno
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Well Clarky its very useful , and you have done a good job showing us all how much difference it makes . Clearly as you have shown a fan on the hot days would be good to have for peice of mind . cheers..

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 7 years, 2 months ago #2983

  • Clarky
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Thanks Wayno,

I guess it really all depends on your riding style, and your attitude to cooling.

If you ride mainly fast tracks, then I'm guessing this would probably be a waste of time.

If like me, you ride a bit slower and/or more bumpy tracks with lots of gradient changes, then your average temp is likely to be higher.

As far as attitudes to cooling, as others have stated, coolant in a system will not boil til the temp gets quite high. I'm sure Suzuki considered all this and has done a lot more testing than a "humble man in has shed", but looking at the stats for the SM version of these bikes, I personally am a lot happier thinking that my bike will remain below 100° with this mod installed.

To anyone concerned about cooling, I would suggest buying a TTO gauge (mine cost me about AU$43.50 from eBay) and installing it on the bike (it's very easy) and make up your own mind about whether you think you need a fan, before attempting this mod.

I will report back when I have some more temps, and also when I have finsihed the installation.

Clarky
2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 7 years, 2 months ago #2986

  • Buddy
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Following this Topic with interest. just found these waterproof fans on ebay.

stores.ebay.com.au/mynewfan/Fans-Waterproof-to-IP55-/_i.html?_fsub=2729485015&_sid=1037166865&_trksid=p4634.c0.m322

My thoughts for me might be Temp gauge and manual switch for fan when the going is slow.

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 7 years, 2 months ago #2988

  • Clarky
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Thanks for that Buddy,

There look to be some good fans on there.
2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 7 years, 2 months ago #2989

  • Clarky
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Been out for a ride in the hills today with the temp gauge fitted and collected some data.

Outside air temperature was 18°

I headed for some of the steepest and bumpiest tracks I know of, to put the cooling system through its paces and try and get some worst case scenarios (see pics) – crawling climbs and descents.

The roads to these tracks are a few kms of 70, 80 and 90 kmh limits. At these speeds, the temp seems to hold between the 55° - 60° mark.

Out on the tracks, I tackled some slow/moderate tracks first before I got to the really slow bumpy stuff. At between 20 – 40kmh, the temp ranged at about 70° - 75° mark

When I got to the steep, bumpy stuff at between 10 – 20km/h, the temp was at around the 80° - 85°. It seems perfectly happy as long as there is some airflow going through the radiator. A couple of times I came down to walking speed navigating either rocks, or deep ruts, and the max temp I hit was 94°.

So, my conclusions so far.

The cooling system seems to cope well as long as it has airflow. It only has a small capacity and I believe the E model does not have a thermostat, so it reacts very quickly to changes in airflow, as there is no thermostat to regulate the temp (although this probably only means the engine cools down more quickly) Once you start to slow down, the temp does increase quite quickly. If you are going to stop for a chat/toilet break/drink/GPS check etc, then I would recommend switching off the engine.

I am currently now undecided about whether or not to carry on with this install, as I am really not sure it is worth it. I have bought all the parts, and made the mounting bracket, so I’d like to think that my opinion is unbiased. I was going to do the install probably next weekend, as the bike is due a service, and I was going to cut the hose to install the thermo switch while I had the cooling system drained. I am now going to wait for a bit while I consider the following factors:

It is winter here in Australia (for those in the Northern Hemisphere who don’t know this). It was 18° today, but Perth summers can be long and scorching – we can see nearly 40° every day for a couple of months here over the summer. I’m sure this will have some effect on the cooling. Even though I don’t intend to be riding in 40° during the hottest part of the day, even 30° is still considerably warmer than the outside temp I tested it in today (probably even hotter in direct sun). Will 10° hotter outside mean the bike will run approx 10° hotter? I am not sure.

The coolant temp today hit 94° max, and I think I have said that if I saw the coolant temp go upwards of 100° regularly, then I would consider a fan is worth installing. I think this will probably be the deciding factor when summer comes. The tracks I was riding on today were pretty slow, steep and bumpy, and I purposefully rode these for several kms to put a strain on the cooling system. 94° is nothing to get excited about, and considering the warning light on the SM models doesn’t come on til 117°, then I wouldn’t be too concerned if it spiked to 110° for short periods when riding slow sections of track during the summer months.
I think that the SM models may have the fan mainly for being stuck at traffic lights through city traffic. I could see this being a problem for the E models if they were being used in a lot of stop/start city traffic during hot days.

So, I will now wait until the weather heats up, and keep an eye on the temp gauge before making a decision. It may be the case that these systems really can cope with an awful lot of heat, and maybe installing a temp gauge is an unneccessary worry, however, I like to keep an eye on what the engine is doing, so mine is going to stay.

If I get any more useful info, I will let you know.

Any questions/suggestions are welcome.

Clarky.
Attachments:
2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 7 years, 2 months ago #2990

  • Buddy
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Great work Clarky, I am thinking that a fan would be a worth while mod as I do a bit of tight single trail and the bike has boiled a couple of times after pulling up for only 15/20 seconds of idling in summer. I now shut it down straight away every time I pull up now. It is usually hotter than 18 degrees here too. thanks Buddy

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 7 years, 2 months ago #2993

  • Clarky
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Interesting to hear from someone who has had some cooling issues. Regular occurrence? You have a temp gauge fitted?
2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 7 years, 2 months ago #2996

  • Buddy
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No its not a regular happening now, it boiled a couple of times when I pulled up idling for 30 seconds after some very slow going and it was a hot day. I turn the bike off as soon as I see a hold up now. I have spoken to a guy out west who uses DRZ's for mustering and they have to fit fans to keep them cool. (must be fast cows out there) I think I am going to fit one of those water proof fans and a temp gauge just to be sure.

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 7 years, 2 months ago #2997

  • Clarky
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Where does it boil from Buddy? Out the expansion bottle?

My elctronic fan controller turned up today - looks neat. Will post some pics of it and a wiring diagram later.
2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E
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