you are here:

Private Messages

You are not logged in.

Hot Topics

    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol
    • wanglili
    • ralph lauren uk (http://www.pol

More Topics »

Login form



Welcome, Guest
Username Password: Remember me

Electric Fan on Australian E models
(1 viewing) (1) Guest
Share your modifications both the ones that worked and ones not worth doing.

TOPIC: Electric Fan on Australian E models

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 5 years, 4 months ago #2998

  • Clarky
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 86
As mentioned earlier, a couple of pics of the electronic fan controller (thermo switch). This sits inline in one of the hoses (top left one looks good) and switches the fan on and off when the temp gets too high/back to normal. It is adjustable between 70° and 120° (there is a little adjustment screw, seen in the second pic).

It also comes with the relay pre-wired to it.

Have included a copy of the instruction brochure for those interested. It wasn't the cheapest to buy, but was hard trying to find one that fitted the small coolant hoses that motorbikes use.

Still in two minds whether to install, although am sorely tempted now that it has been delivered I must admit....

Clarky
Attachments:
2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 5 years, 4 months ago #2999

  • Buddy
  • OFFLINE
  • Senior Boarder
  • Posts: 27
Clarky wrote:
Where does it boil from Buddy? Out the expansion bottle?

My elctronic fan controller turned up today - looks neat. Will post some pics of it and a wiring diagram later.


I boils into the expansion bottle suppose it put 50mm in the bottom of it, when it cooled it sucked it back into it.

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 5 years, 4 months ago #3001

  • Clarky
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 86
Out of interest, how did you know it was boiling over? Could you hear it at shutdown?
2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 5 years, 4 months ago #3003

  • Buddy
  • OFFLINE
  • Senior Boarder
  • Posts: 27
Clarky wrote:
Out of interest, how did you know it was boiling over? Could you hear it at shutdown?


You could smell the coolant in the expansion bottle. Plus there was a little bit of steam.

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 5 years, 4 months ago #3007

  • Clarky
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 86
Well,

After a ride on sat, I noticed the coolant temp was up into the mid nineties again after not much slow stuff.

I thought to myself that seeing as I now have all the bits for the install, and I'm concerned enough that I would recommend switching off the engine at every brief stop (which can't be good for the engine or starter), then why not push ahead with the install. I can always revert back to standard at a later date if I want to.

So, I thought I’d make a start, although I haven’t finished the inner fan bracket yet, I thought I could still fully install the thermo switch, and temporarily install the fan and test the system.

I started off (once I’d drained the coolant) by picking a spot on the top LH radiator hose where it flows into the radiator straight from the engine, so is at its hottest, marking it and cutting out a section to install the fan controller (thermo switch). I chopped it out with a big long sharp knife to save removing the hose entirely from the bike, as I don't think you'd manage to cut all the way through with a Stanley Knife in situ, blade's not long enough - I reckon a kitchen knife would work too, although a thorough clean would be recommended afterwards.

Once I cut through it, I fitted the switch and did up the hose clamps – you’ll see from the pics that I had a change of mind about which way to have it, and decided to turn it around in the end and have the wire facing inwards, towards the frame. I have faced the large part of the switch down, to avoid the fuel tank. There is a little adjustment screw in there and you can reach it fine at this angle. The fluid flows right through the switch – there is no restriction at all, it must sense the temp through the housing.

I then refilled the cooling system and left it for five mins, to check for any obvious leaks – there were none.

Now time to connect the wiring, which was very easy. The relay comes pre-wired with a plug, so all you have to do is connect one wire straight to the battery, one to the fan, then two to earth. I temporarily rigged this up, reinstalled the fuel tank (which fits), and started the bike.

The switch lets you turn the fan on anywhere between 70° - 120°. I set it at about 98° according to the TTO gauge and the fan cuts in fine when it should. For some reason the temp wasn’t dropping rapidly like it did on my last test – the fan couldn’t cool it enough to turn the thermo switch off, but when I checked the coolant, it was a bit on the low side after I’d refilled and run, so I will try again tomorrow.

I shut the engine off to test at what temp the fan would shut off (it is wired straight to the battery and keeps running), and it dropped 10° to 88° before cutting out. This seems about right.

So, all in all fairly successful so far. The thermo switch works like it’s supposed to, was easy to install and has no leaks. Even though the fan is quite a noisy little sucker, you cannot hear it above the engine, so I think I will install a small warning light next to the temp gauge, to let you know when it is running. I’m a little annoyed the fan wouldn’t cool the coolant rapidly like my last test, but it was a bit on the low side – way below the radiator fins, and considering that the cooling system only holds 1.25 litres, this probably makes a fair difference. I would have topped it up and re-tested it, except I didn’t want to put cold coolant into a hot engine, and it was 11.30 at night and I didn’t want to upset the neighbours any more.

Will top up and re-test tomorrow afternoon and post results.

All for now

Clarky
2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 5 years, 4 months ago #3009

  • Clarky
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 86
Success!

Topped up the cooling system, and it has fixed the problem of the temp not dropping with the fan on. It wasn’t hugely low, but I think it was probably low enough not to be able to transfer enough fluid from left (water from engine) radiator to right (fan mounted, water to engine) radiator via the top balance hose, so the coolant wasn’t flowing sufficiently down the right radiator through the fan cooled area. If that makes sense?

I have posted a movie of the system up and running. As I mentioned in the last post, you really can’t hear the fan cut in/out with the engine running, so I have rigged up a spare indicator on the thermo switch so that it switches on/off the same time as the fan so you can see what the temp does when the fan cuts in/out.

As before, it is not a particularly exciting vid to anyone other than those interested in this mod.

The thermo switch cools the system down 10° from whatever you set it at, before switching off

I set it to come on at 97°, and it switched off at 87° - it took about 2 mins to achieve this.

So, there you have it for now, the system works. Will be interested to see how it copes on hot days and will let you all know when I have experienced them.

I’d think it is a good little system, although there is not a lot of room to fit a fan there. Anything less powerful then what I have fitted, I’m doubting would have much of an effect, but I will leave that up for someone else to test ;-)

If I could get hold of one of those Spal fans easily/cheaply enough in Australia, I would be sorely tempted to fit one, as they look small and a lot more powerful than the one I have fitted (they are proper auto fans).

Hope people have found this useful

Clarky.

2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 5 years, 4 months ago #3013

  • Darkman
  • OFFLINE
  • Fresh Boarder
  • Posts: 8
Great effort!

Are you going to keep a light "indicator" permanently with the installed system? Maybe an LED or something just to show you when it is on or off.

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 5 years, 4 months ago #3015

  • Clarky
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 86
Hi Darkman - that was my thinking too. I have ordered a little blue LED warning light from eBay. I am going to mount it next to the temp gauge on a custom mounting bar I am making. Will add more pics as I progress.
2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 5 years, 4 months ago #3016

  • Clarky
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 86
I finally came up with a method of making the inner mount for the fan - a bit fiddly, but solves the problem quite nicely, and doesn't interfere with the fuel tank. All just needs a tidy up and a lick of black paint now.

Clarky
Attachments:
2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 5 years, 4 months ago #3021

  • Clarky
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 86
I took the bike up for its first test with the fan up in the hills today.

Mixed results

Was a little warmer today - about 22°, and I had the side panel and radiator guard on (which may keep a little more heat in). I stopped when I got to the destination to have a drink, swap some stuff into my bag, and I left the engine running to see how the fan would cope. It soon built in temp and the fan cut in at about 100° like it was supposed to. I have the indictor light taped to the handlebar still, so I can see when the fan is running or not. It was only able to bring the temp down a degree or two. It got it down to about 98° and there it stayed, not moving. Once I got on the bike and started moving again, the temp dropped and the fan switched off like it was supposed to. I tried this a few times on my ride, and it was the same every time.

I was thinking that maybe a more powerful fan would make more of a difference, but I have come to the conclusion that it is just simply the way the E model cooling system is different to the S & SM models by the way the coolant flows through the radiators (see attached diagram). On the S & SM models, the coolant flows through one radiator and then the other before returning to the engine. This means the fan gets to act on all the coolant as it flows past.
On the E model, the coolant splits and then flows through both radiators, so half the coolant goes through each one. This means only half the coolant is getting cool air from the fan I have installed. It then mixes back with the warmer coolant from the other radiator before returning to the engine.

To really make a major difference on the temp, I think a fan would be needed on each radiator (which I am not going to do)

I hope this makes sense.

So, a bit disapointing that the temp won't drop more and then shut off, but it is stopping it climbing into the really hot range, so a mixed result, but overall a success I think. If you need to get off the bike to take a leak/photo/drink/ check map/send text message then the little fan will keep the temp from climbing too high - gotta be better for the life of the engine.

My only remaining question is why did suzuki decide to do it differently on the different models? Would be interested to hear any theroies on this.

Clarky.
Attachments:
2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 5 years, 3 months ago #3028

  • wayno
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 421
Hi Clarky your doing a great job there mate , now looking at the two diferent cooling systems it looks like you could redirect the flow on the E model to match the S and SM ? , just a thought ?

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 5 years, 3 months ago #3030

  • Clarky
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 86
Thanks Wayno - I had thought of that, but am reluctant to start playing around with the cooling system to that degree (is the water pump the same, etc etc)

I'm sure Suzuki had their reasons for the different plumbing, but I can't for the life of me think what it could be.
2000 Suzuki SV650S
1980 Honda CX500A
2007 Suzuki DRZ400E

Re: Electric Fan on Australian E models 4 years, 6 months ago #3664

  • Owey
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 59
Here is the post on the fans

wanglili 5 hours, 19 minutes ago #14656

  • wanglili
  • OFFLINE
  • Expert Boarder
  • Posts: 121
ralph lauren uk
ugg outlet store
michael kors outlet clearance
ugg outlet
ugg boots
canada goose
canada goose outlet
polo outlet
coach outlet store online
oakley sunglasses
pandora outlet
longchamp bags
canada goose outlet
christian louboutin shoes
adidas outlet
michael kors outlet clearance
ugg boots on sale
cheap uggs
ultra boosts
ralph lauren polo
cheap nike shoes
nike shoes for men
ray ban sunglasse
coach outlet
uggs outlet
prada outlet stores
longchamp outlet
michael kors handbags
ray ban sunglasses
canada goose jackets
coach outlet
canada goose jackets
polo outlet
michael kors outlet
uggs outlet
ferragamo outlet
michael kors outlet store
uggs outlet
coach outlet
canada goose jackets
ralph lauren shirts
canada goose
christian louboutin outlet
jordan retro shoes
coach outlet
canada goose uk
nike air max
polo ralph lauren outlet online
canada goose outlet online
ralph lauren outlet
valentino shoes
canada goose
michael kors outlet
moncler outlet
lacoste clothing
kate spade sale
nike outlet
michael kors outlet
christian louboutin uk
ugg outlet
nike outlet
pandora charms
nike air max
uggs outlet
cheap ugg boots
pandora charms
coach outlet
michael kors outlet online
pandora jewelry
canada goose jackets
ugg boots clearance
ugg boots clearance
michael kors outlet online
ray ban sunglasse
cheap ugg boots
michael kors outlet online
cheap jordans
adidas yeezy
uggs outlet
coach outlet store online
nike shoes
coach outlet store online
coach outlet online
pandora charms
uggs outlet
cheap ray ban
ugg outlet
michael kors outlet online
ugg outlet
coach outlet
michael kors outlet online
nike shoes outlet
canada goose outlet online
ed hardy
fitflops outlet
canada goose jackets
canada goose parka
cheap uggs
nhl jerseys
coach outlet
canada goose outlet
mbt outlet
air jordan shoes
uggs outlet
michael kors outlet online store
canada goose outlet store
fred perry clothing
canada goose outlet
ugg outlet store
ray ban sunglasses wholesale
ralph lauren uk
true religion outlet store
coach outlet
coach outlet
mont blanc outlet
mlb jerseys
nfl jerseys
cheap mlb jerseys
michael kors outlet online
michael kors outlet
true religion outlet
cheap oakley sunglasses
polo ralph lauren outlet
michael kors handbags
mlb jerseys
coach outlet online store
oakley sunglasses wholesale
canada goose jackets
moncler outlet
cheap uggs
mulberry outlet
coach factory outlet
canada goose
canada goose jackets canada
ugg boots
ray ban sunglasses
coach outlet online
ugg boots canada
michael kors outlet clearance
polo outlet
ugg outlet
uggs outlet
20171215wangliliB
Time to create page: 0.30 seconds